Sencha Green Pea Soup

Sencha and Green Pea Soup
Looking for a simple soup that comes together in minutes and tastes clean and fresh?  Try our Sencha Green Pea Soup!

This delicate, blended soup combines the sweet and grassy taste of sencha with the crisp flavour of green peas.  We recommend avoiding the addition of strong flavours like onion and garlic to this soup, since those will mask the fresh green tea and sweet vegetables.  Instead, we’ve added classic mint and a hint of tarragon to help those gentle, summer flavours take centre stage.

Serve with a slice of your favourite bread for a light lunch, or as the starter for a larger meal.

Ingredients:

3 cups frozen peas
1 cup of freshly brewed Tealish Organic Sencha
Generous pinch of dried tarragon
2 teaspoons fresh mint, minced, plus extra to garnish
Salt and pepper, to taste
Olive oil, to garnish

Directions:

1. Bring a pot of water to boil.  Add peas and cook, covered, for about five minutes, until peas are bright green and soft.

2. Put peas, tea, tarragon, mint, salt and pepper into a blender, and process until combined.  You don’t want the soup to be completely smooth – a few pieces of whole peas add a lovely texture.

3. Pour into bowls, and garnish with mint and a drizzle of olive oil.

Rooibos Snickerdoodles with Chai Spice

 

Rooibos Snickerdoodles

Love rooibos? Us too. That’s why this week we’ve added it to the humble Snickerdoodle and upped the ante on the traditional sugar-and-cinnamon topped cookie!

To complement the sweet, earthy taste of these bonafide tea cookies, we’ve dusted them with chai spices instead of plain old sugar and cinnamon. We think we may have just discovered the ultimate Snickerdoodle – try it yourself and see!

To transform your Snickerdoodles into red tea and spice cookies, simply add some Tealish Rooibos Latte Mix to your favourite Snickerdoodle recipe. Our Latte Mix is a unique and versatile tea: made of stoneground rooibos and gently mixed with a bit of fruit pectin and cane sugar, the powdered form of this tea makes it a snap to add to baking! For these cookies, add one teaspoon of rooibos for every cup of flour, and combine with the dry ingredients.

rooibos latte mix

Then, toss a few different spices into your sugar-and-cinnamon mix. Pick and choose from your favourite chai flavours – we love cinnamon combined with ginger, cardamom and a pinch of nutmeg, but allspice and ground fennel are nice, too.  Your kitchen will smell warm and inviting as these bake in the oven!

Serve alongside a nice cup of tea, preferably with family and friends.

 

Tropical Sunrise Smoothie

papayasmoothieBring on the tastes of summer with this cheerful smoothie, a lush blend of Tropical Sunrise green tea and fresh papaya, mango and carrot!  A spoonful of honey and a dash of orange juice add just a touch of sweet and sour to the mix.  This smoothie brings out the sunny flavours of Tealish Tropical Sunrise tea, a blend of crisp sencha, orange, papaya and lemongrass, and is a must-try for papaya lovers!

Ingredients:

1 cup of fresh papaya, cut into cubes
1/2 cup fresh mango, cubed
1/2 cup Tropical Sunrise iced tea*
1/2 cup grated carrot
1/4 cup orange juice
1 tablespoon honey

Directions:

Put all ingredients into blender and process until smooth.  Enjoy!

*For two ways to make the perfect iced tea, go here.

Rooibos Risotto with Asparagus and Coconut

Rooibos Risotto 2
While we typically think of South African rooibos as a welcome addition to desserts, the sweet, slightly woodsy character of this tea also works well in savoury dishes, imparting a delicate flavour and gorgeous hue. Here, we’ve used rooibos in place of broth and paired it with fresh, spring asparagus and creamy coconut to make a risotto that tastes as good as it looks.

Ingredients:
1 bunch asparagus
2 tablespoons coconut oil
1 cup risotto rice
½ onion, finely diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 inch piece of ginger, minced
1 stalk of lemongrass, peeled and gently bruised
2 lime leaves
½ cup dry white wine
3 cups prepared Tealish Organic Rooibos tea
½ teaspoon salt
¾ cup coconut milk
½ tablespoon agave
½ tablespoon lime juice
Freshly ground pepper, to taste
Unsweetened shredded coconut and thinly sliced Thai basil, to garnish

Directions:

  1. Begin by preparing your tea. Make sure the infusion is strong, and keep the tea warm!
  2. Wash and trim the ends off the asparagus. Slice into 2-inch pieces, saving a few stalks whole for garnishing the bowls.
  3. Warm 1 tablespoon of the coconut oil in a large non-stick fry pan. Add the asparagus and a pinch of salt, and cook until the asparagus is bright green but still has a bite to it, about three minutes. Transfer asparagus to a plate and reserve.
  4. Heat a large saucepan on medium, and add the remainder of the coconut oil. Add the onion and cook until translucent, 5-7 minutes. Stir in the garlic and ginger and cook for an additional two minutes, until fragrant.
  5. Add the rice to the saucepan and stir to coat. Allow the rice to toast for about two minutes. Pour in the wine and stir until all the liquid has been absorbed.
  6. Place the lemongrass and lime leaves in the saucepan, along with ½ cup of the tea and the salt. Stir gently until all the tea has been absorbed.
  7. Continue to ladle the tea into the rice, ½ cup at a time, making sure all the liquid is absorbed before adding the next ladleful. You will need up to three cups of tea, depending on how dry your rice is. The rice is done when it is tender but still firm to the bite.
  8. Remove the lemongrass and lime leaves. Stir in the coconut milk, lime juice, agave and pepper, and add the asparagus. Cover, reduce heat to very low and let the mixture warm for about five more minutes.
  9. Serve in bowls, garnished with shredded coconut, Thai basil leaves and reserved stalks of asparagus.
  10. Enjoy!

 

Chamomile, Banana and Oat Smoothie

 

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This is a gentle and uncomplicated smoothie that’s easy to make and even easier to drink. Here, floral chamomile tea is perfectly complemented by sweet banana and creamy, comforting oats.  A dash of honey adds extra sweetness!  Try this drink on those days when you need a calm, cool moment.

Ingredients:

1 banana, frozen
3 tablespoons rolled oats
1 tablespoon honey
1 cup of iced Tealish chamomile tea*

Directions:

Put all ingredients into blender and process until smooth.  Enjoy!

*Not sure how to make iced tea?  See our recipe for the perfect glass here!

To Put the Milk in First, or To Put the Milk in Second? That is the Question

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In 1946, George Orwell published the essay “A Nice Cup of Tea” in the Evening Standard. It turns out the author of Animal Farm and 1984 had some pretty clear ideas on precisely how to prepare a good cup of black tea.

Included in his list of eleven rules are a few points that Orwell himself called “acutely controversial.” Among them: tea should be made in small amounts, using a vessel made of china or earthenware, and tea should be left loose in the pot so as not to “imprison” the tea. But one of the most hotly debated of Orwell’s prescriptions is his rule that milk be added to the cup after the tea.

Nearly 60 years after Orwell’s essay, the popular British newspaper The Guardian disputed Orwell’s rule of milk in second. While Orwell makes his recommendation based on the fact that you can regulate the amount of milk better when you add it after the tea is poured, The Guardian looks to science to end the debate, reporting research conducted by the Royal Society of Chemistry that indicates milk should be added first. Here’s why, according to the chemists: when you add milk to hot tea, the temperature causes the milk to degrade and this alters its taste. By adding the milk first and the tea second, you reduce your chances of this.

Historically, however, taste wasn’t what was at stake in the milk-in-tea debate. It was the preservation of the teacup! Hot tea sometimes caused lower-quality teacups to crack, and so adding milk to the cup first was a way of cooling the temperature and preventing this. Those who could afford better quality teaware that could withstand hotter temperatures could add the milk second without risk of breaking their cups.

Of course, not everyone adds milk to their black tea, and those who do don’t necessarily use dairy milk. Soy, almond and coconut milk are all delicious non-dairy options that are commonly used in tea.

For those who do like their tea milky, some of our favourite Tealish black teas to take with milk are the decadent, vanilla La Creme, Earl Greypfruit, a twist on the Earl’s favourite bergamot blend and the robust, classic Irish Breakfast.  If you’re looking for a caffeine-free way to replicate the milk-in-tea ritual, try rooibos!  This South African plant is naturally caffeine-free and takes milk well, so when you’re craving a nice cup before bed, reach for the rooibos!  We especially love warm, spicy Banana Bread Rooibos and creamy Tahitian Vanilla Rooibos with milk.

How do you take your tea? Without or without milk? Milk in first, or milk in second? Do you use dairy milk or a non-dairy option?

Whether you agree with Orwell, side with the chemists, or always take your tea straight, there’s one thing we all can agree on – there’s nothing like a nice cup of tea!

Easter Cupcakes

Coconut Cream Chai and Van Lav Cupcakes 4

If you’re looking for a sweet finish to your meal this Easter (or maybe even a sweet start to your Sunday – who are we to judge?) look no further than this.  Add a bit of tea to your favourite vanilla cupcake recipe, and you’ll transform your dessert into something indescribably good.  We promise.

This holiday weekend, we took your basic vanilla cupcake to a whole new level by adding two different types of tea to the batter and ending up with two different kinds of cupcakes!

To harness the sweetness of springtime flowers, we added gentle Vanilla Lavender Rooibos to vanilla cupcakes and topped them with rose-infused frosting (and some dried flowers for decoration, of course).

Van Lav Cupcakes 2

For those looking for something a little less floral, we created Coconut Cream Chai Cupcakes.  Here, our spicy coconut tea blend meets the humble vanilla cupcake, and the result is delicious.  Coconut, ginger and cinnamon cozy up nicely to the vanilla batter.  Topped with coconut-flavoured frosting and rolled in toasted coconut shreds, this cupcake is as delicious as it is beautiful.

Coconut Cream Chai Cupcakes 1

Here’s how we did it:

1. First, prepare your tea.  Take 1/2 teaspoon of Vanilla Lavender rooibos and crush it using a mortar and pestle.  Set rooibos tea aside, then do the same for 1/2 teaspoon of Coconut Cream Chai.

2. Next, take your favourite vanilla cupcake recipe and prepare as usual.  Stop just before you scrape the batter into cupcake liners – first you have to add the tea.

3. Divide the batter between two bowls.  Into one bowl, add the Vanilla Lavender Rooibos, and add the Coconut Cream Chai into the other.  Stir each to incorporate.  Then pour into cupcake liners and bake as usual.

4. Meanwhile, prepare the frosting.  Again, proceed as usual, following your favourite recipe for vanilla buttercream.  Divide frosting between two bowls.  Into one, add rosewater (and food colouring, if you want a pale purple frosting).  To the other, add coconut extract.  Keep covered in fridge until ready to use.

5. Now, toast your shredded coconut.  All you have to do is place about 3/4 cup of shredded coconut in a pan, turn the heat to medium and stir until the coconut is a light bright colour.  Your kitchen will smell wonderful, too!  Spread the coconut out on a plate.

6. Once the cupcakes are completely cool, frost them – the rose frosting for the Vanilla Lavender, and the Coconut for the Coconut Cream Chai.  Decorate the Vanilla Lavender cupcakes with rose petals and lavender flowers – or just use a sprinkle of Vanilla Lavender rooibos if that’s all you’ve got! – and roll the Coconut Cream Chai cupcakes in the toasted coconut.

Van Lav Cupcakes 3

Adding the ground whole tea leaf to your cupcake mix will impart an intense taste that goes above and beyond simply steeping the tea in milk that you incorporate into the batter.  These cupcakes pack a powerful punch of delicious flavour!

Even better, by taking one recipe and creating two options for your guests, you’ll satisfy even the pickiest of eaters without adding a lot of extra work to your already-busy food preparations.  Start with a recipe that’s vegan or gluten-free if that floats your boat, or go old-school with grandma’s recipe (or even from a box!).  We promise that adding tea to whatever cupcakes you usually bake will take your dessert to a whole new level!

Happy Easter from Tealish!

Happy Easter

What’s in a Cup of Tea?

 

tea wall

According to the Tea Association of Canada, we here in the Great White North have been drinking tea since 1716, when it first reached our shores as part of a shipment for the Hudson’s Bay Company after a year in transit. Canadians have been tea drinkers ever since – about 10 billion cups are consumed here each year!

Some people like their tea black with a little cream and sugar, while others prefer green or white tea with a slice of lemon or a spoonful of honey. Then there are folks who enjoy sipping oolong tea with the giant leaves unfurled at the bottom of the cup. There is a multitude of ways that you can take your tea, and amazingly, they all start with the same plant.

What is Tea?
Tea comes from the camellia sinensis plant, which is indigenous to China and India. Tea is now also grown in places all over the world, but most commonly in Japan, Sri Lanka and Nepal. Differences in growing conditions will produce subtle differences in the way teas taste. But the flavour of tea comes from more than its growing conditions!

Some teas taste malty and robust, while others are sweet and grassy or light and floral. This diversity of flavour stems mostly from the way tea is processed. The different types of tea – black, oolong, green and white – are ultimately the result of what happens to the leaves after they’re picked.

Black Tea
This tea is prepared from leaves that are picked, withered, rolled and then left to oxidize before they are fired. Black tea is usually prepared with boiling water. This produces a strong cup of tea that takes milk and sugar well.

Try: Golden Garden Ceylon for a clean finish or malty Rungagora for a sturdy cup in the morning

Oolong Tea
This tea is partially oxidized, and is therefore sometimes described as falling between black and green tea. After the leaves are picked, the tea is withered and bruised before firing. Oolong tea should be steeped in water that is below boiling and is typically taken without milk or sugar, though of course that’s not a rule!

Oolong teas not only can be steeped more than once, it’s actually a recommended practice! Some folks say the third steep is the best – try it yourself and see!

Try: toasty Formosa, floral Ti Kuan Yin or buttery Milk

Green Tea
Green tea is picked and then dried before heated to halt oxidization. There are two distinct methods of heat processing green tea. The Japanese technique of drying green tea is steaming, while the Chinese method is pan firing. These different methods produce distinct flavors: Japanese style green tea is generally sweet and grassy, while Chinese style green tea is slightly toasty.

Nearly every day at Tealish, we hear from our customers that they thought they didn’t like green tea because they found it bitter, but after talking to us they changed their minds! The secret is in the water temperature: green tea should be steeped in water below boiling to prevent the bitterness of burned tea leaves!

Try: smoky Gunpowder or classic Sencha

White Tea
White tea is the least processed of all the teas made from the camellia sinensis plant – it’s made from the youngest leaves and buds and is picked and then steamed or fired to halt oxidization. White tea has a very delicate flavour and should be prepared using water that is below boiling.

Try: Pai Mu Tan for a great everyday option, or share a cup of Silver Needle to celebrate a special occasion with a friend.

While many of us love tea just as is, flavoured blends are increasing in popularity, and Tealish has a whole wall to choose from! We also have herbal and rooibos infusions – these are not true teas in that they don’t come from the camellia sinensis plant, but since they are steeped in water we think of them as teas, too!

Which type of tea is your favourite? How do you take your tea?

Spring Cleaning with Tea!

 

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Here in Toronto, the temperatures have been above freezing for one full week! Spring has officially arrived, and we’re throwing open our windows in celebration!

Tea can be your best friend when it comes to getting ready for warmer weather. Here are six of our favourite ways to incorporate tea into our routines:

 AROUND THE HOUSE

  • Use black tea to clean and shine hardwood floors. Add two teaspoons of plain black tea to boiling water, let steep about three minutes, then remove leaves (don’t discard! We’ll tell you how to use those leaves in a moment!). Allow liquid to cool, then pour into a spray bottle and spray lightly on floors. Wipe with a mop and you’re done! No need to rinse. Bonus: the black tea will help to enhance the deep colour of hardhood, so over time, your floors will look even better. Also great on windows and mirrors!
  • A black tea infusion is a great way to mask scratches on wooden furniture. Brew up a strong cup of black tea (try adding twice the amount of leaves for darker wood), allow it to cool and then dab onto scratches with a cotton ball. The tea will stain the wood and hide the scratch.
  • Use leftover tea leaves to deodorize your fridge. Once used tea leaves are dry, just put them in your refrigerator (we recommend putting them in a pretty bowl or tying them up in cheesecloth) to absorb unpleasant odours. No need to buy baking soda, and a great way to reuse tea!

BEAUTY

  • Apply brewed black tea to a sunburn to help heal your skin. Enjoying the sun so much that you overdid it? Don’t worry – there’s a tea for that. Brew a cup of black tea and allow it to cool, then use a soft cloth to gently apply the tea to your skin. Do not wipe off.
  • Reduce the appearance of puffy eyes. Folk medicine has long boasted the benefits of black tea for puffy under eye circles! Try it yourself at home: fill two tea filters with one teaspoon of black tea each. Gently soak the teabags in boiling water and allow to cool. Put brewed tea and teabags in fridge for about half an hour so they’re nice and chilled, then wring out teabags and place on your eyes for five minutes.
  • Use green tea to exfoliate your skin. A mixture of brewed green tea and sugar will help to smooth your skin. Combine 1 tablespoon of lukewarm green tea with about 4 tablespoons of sugar. Make sure the tea isn’t too hot, or the sugar will dissolve! Using your fingertips, apply paste to your face, gently rubbing in a circular motion. Rinse off with warm water.

Have you tried any of these ideas? What are some of the other non-traditional ways that you like to use tea?

Razzmintazz Smoothie

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This pretty pink smoothie is a terrific morning pick-me-up!  Fresh strawberries and raspberries blend perfectly with Razzmintazz, a delicious fusion of fruity blackberries and raspberries, tart hibiscus, floral chamomile and cool peppermint.  The end result is a sweet and refreshing breakfast drink that’s sure to brighten even the rainiest of days in April.

Serves one thirsty person

Ingredients:

1 cup fresh strawberries, rinsed and hulled
1 cup fresh raspberries, rinsed
1 banana
1/4 piece of avocado
1-2 tablespoons agave or honey, optional
1 cup boiling water
4 teaspoons Razzmintazz tea
1 glass of ice

Directions

1. Start by brewing your tea.  Put the tea leaves in a small brewing vessel, pour the water over them and allow the tea to steep for about four minutes.  This will create a strong infusion.  When the tea is brewed, pour it over the glass of ice.  Some of the ice will melt and dilute that infusion, and you’ll be left with the perfect glass of iced tea!

2. Put the rest of the ingredients along with the tea into a blender, and blend until smooth.

3. Enjoy!

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ABOUT TEALISH

Tealish is a modern tea boutique located in downtown Toronto, Canada. This blog is meant to be a peek in to what Tealish is up to as well as a source of information about loose leaf tea and all things tea related. We hope you enjoy these posts and we hope you enjoy our teas – check us out online at www.tealish.com

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